69th Revels dedicated to Pennington

Courtesy Photo / THE FLARE. Joyce Pennington, right, has helped raised approximately $130,000 in scholarships for Rangerettes. She is shown here with Miss Gussie Nell Davis, and Dr. Irving Dreibrodt, founders of the American Dance/Drill Team School, of which she now is president and owner.
Courtesy Photo / THE FLARE. Joyce Pennington, right, has helped raised approximately $130,000 in scholarships for Rangerettes. She is shown here with Miss Gussie Nell Davis, and Dr. Irving Dreibrodt, founders of the American Dance/Drill Team School, of which she now is president and owner.

The 69th annual Rangerette Revels, “Get Your Move On,” is dedicated to Joyce Pennington, president, CEO and owner of the American Dance/Drill Team School headquartered in Salado.

Pennington has been an active supporter of the Rangerettes for more than 30 years.

Though Pennington is not a former Rangerette, she was named an honorary Rangerette Forever because of her support.

Some of her endeavors include raising money for Rangerette scholarships through the Gussie Nell Davis Dance Classic Competition, Rangerette Revelation Dance Intensive and several other support work efforts, totaling approximately $130,000.

The announcement of the dedication was made in January at the Rangerette Revelation Convention.

“It is something I will never forget,” Pennington said. “I know what an honor it is, and I am humbled they thought to dedicate the show to me.”

Pennington’s passion first started as a member of the Haltom High School Highsteppers.

“I was always looking for something growing up to spark a passion in my heart, and high school drill team did exactly that. I regret not trying out for the Rangerettes. I just didn’t have a mentor to tell me about them. I knew about them, but I didn’t know enough to take the risk and try out,” Pennington said. “I always encourage my best dancers to try out because I know I missed out on a great opportunity.”

Pennington started the Rangerette Revelations to provide an opportunity for young women who have an interest in the Rangerettes to attend the Intensive.

“I wanted any girl who wanted to learn more to be able to attend the Intensive, which is directed by Rangerette officers and directors,” Pennington said. “I wanted to hopefully stimulate some interest and give them courage to try out.”

In 1958, Gussie Nell Davis and Dr. Irving Dreibrodt started the Salado school. In the 1970s, Pennington was chosen to be an instructor, making her one of the first non-Rangerette instructors.

In 1982, Pennington was asked by Davis to be the executive vice president and in 1984, Pennington and her husband, C.R. Pennington, approached Davis and Dreibrodt about purchasing the company.

“Miss Davis inspired me because she dedicated her whole life to the Rangerettes. We wanted to make sure that we carried on the legacy that they started,” Pennington said.

Pennington plans to attend all five shows along with family, friends and high school teammates.

“I can’t wait to see the show,”  Pennington said. “I think it is fitting to focus on dance and its role in the media through television.”