Father’s football legacy a beacon in injury struggle

 

In 1978, Miles James Marable Jr. was an All-American defensive back for KC’s undefeated national championship team.  He is my dad. Knowing that I go to the same school that my father had great success at really makes it hard for me to realize I might be done with football.

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MILES MARABLE III
Copy Editor

I have been playing football since I was 10. It was the last sport I tried and it became the sport I loved. Growing up, I never considered football an option; the first sport I played was basketball.

My dad and I would often go outside and toss a football for fun, but as I look back there was more to it than just a simple game of catch.

He taught me the little things, such as different positions on the field. My dad taught me how to catch the ball just using my hands, how to run certain routes, and how to hold the ball when I run and throw.

I didn’t think much of it as a kid until I actually started playing the game. After only playing basketball I finally decided to try football. I was always one of the fastest, could jump the highest and was one of the strongest.

In middle school my football career took a huge hit. I tore my ACL in the eighth grade and didn’t get surgery. From then on I just wore a knee brace to help protect and tighten my knee. In high school I played wide receiver for the Grand Prairie Gophers. Due to my knee problem I was never able to play at my full potential. I only started three games on varsity my junior and senior year.

After the last game of my senior year I finally had knee surgery in hopes of resurrecting my football career. Last spring I decided to start my college career at KC where my dad had great success. While growing up I always tried to impress him, or compare myself to him, or prove I was a better athlete. He always used to say don’t compare yourself to me; just be the best that you can be.

Last spring I tried out for the football team. The next day a coach called and said I had a shot at making the team. As spring football went on my injuries got worse, and my performance suffered. I didn’t make the team in the spring, but the coach told me I could come back right before the first game of the season. I told him because of my injuries that I had to decline.

It really hurt me to say that I wasn’t going to play. It hurts even more knowing that this might be it for me. It is hard knowing that I wasn’t able to live up to what my father did or not even come close. My dad was a great football player from his high school days at Thomas Jefferson High in Dallas to KC and then to Tulsa University.

Am I finished with football for good? Who knows what can happen in the future? Whatever happens, I just want to make my dad proud.

Miles Marable III is a freshman  journalism major from Richardson.