Wesley completes chapel renovation

DEZIRAE BURNETT
Staff Writer

After nearly two and a half years after the idea to update the KC Wesley Foundation Chapel was conceived, the remodel is complete.

The original chapel was constructed in 1974 as part of the main building’s structure.

According to Amy Hodge, KC Wesley Foundation director, the room looked like it was stuck in the 1970s.

From the very beginning, Hodge felt that God was calling her to update the chapel and to transform it into a space that was welcoming to anyone who should want to use it.

In the summer of 2010, Hodge brought her plans to change chapel into a “small intimate chapel,” to the Wesley Board.

That November, a plan for the renovation was prepared and demolition quickly followed, beginning with the removal of the stage.

The project cost between $4,000 and $5,000. The funding came partly from the Wesley Foundation’s personal savings account; the rest was donated by private sponsors and from a memorial fund for Hodge’s grandfather, Charles Bailey.

The floor was stained and etched with a cross that runs the length of the space. The wall behind the pulpit is decorated with a stone façade. The room is now equipped with a 55-inch screen and projector that is used to display slides of song lyrics, Christian music videos and Bible verses.

The walls have been painted and individual sponsors bought chairs for the chapel. The room now has the capacity to seat 30.

Sunday night worship, a service called Catalyst, is held in the chapel each week at 7 p.m.

In the future, the room may serve as a classroom setting for religious study classes.

Hodge also hopes to hold Campus Alpha, the Foundation’s current religious study, in the chapel next year.

Dezirae Burnett

Staff Writer

 

After nearly two and a half years after the idea to update the KC Wesley Foundation Chapel was conceived, the remodel is complete.

The original chapel was constructed in 1974 as part of the main building’s structure.

According to Amy Hodge, KC Wesley Foundation director, the room looked like it was stuck in the 1970s.

From the very beginning, Hodge felt that God was calling her to update the chapel and to transform it into a space that was welcoming to anyone who should want to use it.

In the summer of 2010, Hodge brought her plans to change chapel into a “small intimate chapel,” to the Wesley Board.

That November, a plan for the renovation was prepared and demolition quickly followed, beginning with the removal of the stage.

The project cost between $4,000 and $5,000. The funding came partly from the Wesley Foundation’s personal savings account; the rest was donated by private sponsors and from a memorial fund for Hodge’s grandfather, Charles Bailey.

The floor was stained and etched with a cross that runs the length of the space. The wall behind the pulpit is decorated with a stone façade. The room is now equipped with a 55-inch screen and projector that is used to display slides of song lyrics, Christian music videos and Bible verses.

The walls have been painted and individual sponsors bought chairs for the chapel. The room now has the capacity to seat 30.

Sunday night worship, a service called Catalyst, is held in the chapel each week at 7 p.m.

In the future, the room may serve as a classroom setting for religious study classes.

Hodge also hopes to hold Campus Alpha, the Foundation’s current religious study, in the chapel next year.

 

Staff Writer

 

After nearly two and a half years after the idea to update the KC Wesley Foundation Chapel was conceived, the remodel is complete.

The original chapel was constructed in 1974 as part of the main building’s structure.

According to Amy Hodge, KC Wesley Foundation director, the room looked like it was stuck in the 1970s.

From the very beginning, Hodge felt that God was calling her to update the chapel and to transform it into a space that was welcoming to anyone who should want to use it.

In the summer of 2010, Hodge brought her plans to change chapel into a “small intimate chapel,” to the Wesley Board.

That November, a plan for the renovation was prepared and demolition quickly followed, beginning with the removal of the stage.

The project cost between $4,000 and $5,000. The funding came partly from the Wesley Foundation’s personal savings account; the rest was donated by private sponsors and from a memorial fund for Hodge’s grandfather, Charles Bailey.

The floor was stained and etched with a cross that runs the length of the space. The wall behind the pulpit is decorated with a stone façade. The room is now equipped with a 55-inch screen and projector that is used to display slides of song lyrics, Christian music videos and Bible verses.

The walls have been painted and individual sponsors bought chairs for the chapel. The room now has the capacity to seat 30.

Sunday night worship, a service called Catalyst, is held in the chapel each week at 7 p.m.

In the future, the room may serve as a classroom setting for religious study classes.

Hodge also hopes to hold Campus Alpha, the Foundation’s current religious study, in the chapel next year.